Collision Repair

Understanding the Different Part Types Commonly Used

After you have been in an accident, the most important thing is making sure you’re safe. After that, the second most important thing is getting your vehicle back in working order. The outcome of your collision repair service depends greatly on the type of parts your mechanic chooses to use. Whether they use genuine, original equipment manufacturer, or aftermarket parts will determine how well your vehicle will run and how long the rehabilitation will last.

Genuine

Some collision repair services try to use genuine parts in all their restoration work. These pieces are what originally came in the vehicle. Typically, they come in a box with the carmaker’s logo, so you know it is a genuine part.

When it comes to cost, genuine parts are among the most expensive types you can buy for your vehicle. For this reason, it is best to only use these items if they are still under warranty and you don’t have to pay any out of pocket expense.

Despite popular belief, choosing to go with something other than manufacturer parts will not void any remaining warranty. In fact, according to the Federal Trade Commission’s “Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act,” it is illegal for any manufacturer to void the warranty solely based on the type of part you choose to use. The act also allows you to have the work completed anywhere, even at home, without voiding the warranty.

Original Equipment Manufacturer

During your collision repair, you may choose to have Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts installed. While not a genuine piece, it is the exact same as what came in your vehicle because it was created by the same company who built the part for the car company. The difference is it doesn’t have the car company’s logo on the box.

Like genuine, OEM can be more expensive than aftermarket. However, it will cost less than genuine. It is a good way to save a little money and get the same part that was originally in your vehicle.

Aftermarket

Aftermarket pieces are quite common. They look and work in the same manner as the originals. The big difference is a company other than the manufacturer builds it. The structure is designed to fit and perform just as well as the original.

In some cases, aftermarket designs outperform their more expensive counterparts. This is because these companies analyze why the products fail in the first place. Once they know what the underlying problem is, they can make theirs without these flaws. In some cases, it may be as simple as the material was not made to last, and the aftermarket builder chooses something a bit more robust.

In the event that the part is not under warranty or your insurance company is not as concerned about what replacement type is used, you may want to settle for an aftermarket product.

Collision repair uses many different types of products in order to rehabilitate your vehicle. In addition to genuine, OEM, and aftermarket, the mechanic may suggest a rebuilt or reconditioned piece. While these may help keep your costs down, they do have wear and tear, so use them with caution. Article Source